Handstand Tutorial

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Handstand Tutorial

Handstand Tutorial

 

The video above is broken into 10 sections, from beginner to advance levels.

Section 1:

Cat cow movements help to isolate the protraction movement of the shoulder girdle, which can be helpful for creating stability in weight bearing. Protraction is the rounded off "cat" movement.

 

Using the wall is helpful to improve shoulder flexion, which is required for a straight handstand. Slide the feet down and squeeze the chest towards the wall.

 

Taking one leg off the wall at time can increase confidence to eventually move to free standing. The idea is to become very light through the supporting foot until it "floats" off the wall. You shouldn't have to push or use momentum, because as you extend the opposite away from the wall the supporting foot should get naturally drawn off.

 

Section 2:

Alignment. This drill is going to give you a great indication of how the body should feel and be positioned for straight handstand line. you will feel the shoulders squeeze into more flexion, stretching the pects and lats. You will also notice how much you need to engage the glutes and abdominals to maintain contact with the wall.  While there are plenty of shapes and variations to consider and play with, this exercise builds a good foundation for alignment.

 

Section 3:

FEAR OF FALLING (THE SAFE EXIT)

Many have fear of falling out of a handstand. This is one that will hold you back in your practice, especially in the early stages when your body isn’t used to being inverted. Many people are afraid to draw the leading leg off the wall far enough to draw the centre of mass over the base of support, which makes it easier to maintain the balance.

So, to build confidence here, it helps to know how to fall out! The basic method and safest way to fall is to move the hand and cartwheel out. When you feel yourself falling and you cant save it, simply lift the arm of the side you are falling to and place it back on the ground so you can come down side ways back onto your feet. 

 

Section 4:

Kicking up. Once your confidence builds, there are many ways to enter handstand. Moving off the wall is important, because it becomes a hinderence in the long run. Kicking up is probably the easiest place to start. Remember to cartwheel out if uou over balance.

 

Section 5:

Jump from downward dog. Here you need a good base in Bakasana and lolasana.

 

Section 6 and 7:

Handstand presses. Proficiencey in uttanasana and adequate hamstring and adductor length will help the pelvis tilt enough to easily lift the legs.

 

Section 8:

Lifting from lolasana. The trick is to try and keep the shoulders in as much flexion as possible to help with the straight line mechanics right from the start.

 

Section 9:

Bakasana to handstand presses.  These are good for building strength, to allow you to integrate handstand into a flowing sequence.

 

Section 10:

Once you have mastered these variations, then you can put it together in a flowing sequence that increases the scope of your practice, giving you many more options for movement.

 

Disclaimer:

Yoga is best taught one on one according to the needs and requirements of the individual. This advice should be considered general. For a personalised approach to teaching call 9382 1339 to book an appointment with one of our yoga and movement physios.

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Yoga Therapy

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Yoga Therapy

Clinical yoga can be practiced at any age, and also applied as a pain management treatment at any age. Here is Penny practicing at age 79. Several years ago, as a result of persistent shoulder pain, Penny was advised by one surgeon (rather stridently) that she needed bilateral shoulder replacements, and another "more conservative" physician recommended bilateral arthroscopy. 

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Yoga in Clinical Practice

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Yoga in Clinical Practice

Clinical yoga is essentially physiotherapist instructed yoga, designed with an evidence based framework, taught individually, with a biopsychosocial focus and neuroscientific understanding.
This approach to treatment is founded on an understanding of the neuroscience behind the patient-therapist relationship

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Back Bending Technique

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Back Bending Technique

An area of concern for many novice practitioners is correctly progressing with the more advanced back bending postures. While there are specific technique cues to be cognisant of, adequate preparatory work is also crucial to ensure correct technique in advanced practice. There are a number of ways to safely progress into advanced postures.

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Consensus: Exercise First For Fibromyalgia

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Consensus: Exercise First For Fibromyalgia

Note that this consensus statement from the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) notes that exercise should be a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of fibromyalgia.Broadly, the group did not endorse most pharmaceutical interventions, especially drugs with a high potential for abuse.

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Discectomy vs conservative management of sciatica

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Discectomy vs conservative management of sciatica

One large randomised trial (n = 283) with a low risk of bias compared early surgery to prolonged conservative treatment followed by surgery if needed in patients with severe sciatica for 6–12 weeks. At 1 year of follow-up, 95% of patients in both treatment groups had experienced satisfactory recovery, and no subsequent differences were found. This lack of a difference between groups was maintained for the following year

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Yoga for Pain: Personal experience and Evidence

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Yoga for Pain: Personal experience and Evidence

This picture above is me practicing at my teacher’s (Kales) house today. In the context of writing about pain experience, evidence and yoga, I should point out that when I first met Kale, in 2009, I could barely move. 2 years of chronic pain, and what I now recognise as sensitisation, fear avoidance and textbook chronicity markers, I could barely even sit on the ground (hip and knee pain), my squatting ability was non existent (too stiff, too sore).

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Tailoring Yoga to the Western Body

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Tailoring Yoga to the Western Body

Eka Pada Viparita Dandasana II.

In Light on Yoga, Iyengar ranks the poses according to difficulty. 1 being the easiest and 60 being the hardest. This pose is given a 29. (Though the heel should be grabbed in the final posture).

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Yoga, Strength and Physical Fitness

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Yoga, Strength and Physical Fitness

The primary goal of most traditional yoga is to quiet the mind through focused concentration an attention; however, of all the yoga traditions, the importance of physical fitness is emphasized most in hatha yoga

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Exerpt from the 1934 textbook The Yoga Makaranda. Mayurasana:

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Exerpt from the 1934 textbook The Yoga Makaranda. Mayurasana:

This asana must be done before eating (on an empty stomach). Wait a minimum of four hours after eating before practising this asana. This asana should be held from 1 minute up to [a long time] according to the practitioner’s capability. It is good to practise this regularly and to remain in this asana for longer periods during the winter or colder months rather than in the summer.If we make it a habit to practise this asana every day for at least fifteen minutes, we will attain tremendous benefits.

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Yoga to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

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Yoga to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

It is widely accepted that both stress and physical inactivity are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Strategies which promote a healthy lifestyle, including exercise and stress management, have been shown to be beneficial in terms of reducing CVD risk factors. Yoga has been demonstrated to reduce stress [2] and the holding of poses that is involved provides surprising robust exercise and so, theoretically, yoga could be effective as a primary prevention intervention for CVD.

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